Plymouth Yarn Company Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘design’

New Fall PlymouthYarns for Winter 2014/15 and a GIVE AWAY!!

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Wow! Wait until you see this line-up! We have been so busy working on our new line of yarns this year. And we found so many that we had trouble keeping it down to a decent # of yarns.

We have 15 all said and done. I KNOW!!! 15!!!

Here is a description of these yarns for you to read about. NEXT I would like for you to check them out on Ravelry,  tell us your favorite new yarn and what it inspires you to make.

We will select a winner by random draw-so enter often if you like!

Essex: Chunky weight 100% wool wrapped in a charcoal or black thread in a fascinating subtle stripe.  Stitches melt together to create a wonderfully muted, but colorful, substantial fabric. This yarn is great for chunky weight accessories that you’d like to have a pop of color. 

Gina Chunky: We developed a chunky weight version of one of our favorite and best-selling yarns, Gina. Gina Chunky is a single-ply roving in bright, cheerful self-striping colors. This 100% wool will make cozy winter accessories in a snap. Charmingly fresh and bright in a quick to knit gauge.

Homestead: A true Aran! Homestead is a classic 3-ply wool with a design oriented color range. We love this yarn for many reasons. Surprisingly soft yet rustic, homestead will wear well and be a knitters favorite.   

Cashmere Passion: Cashmere never felt so good! In fact, we think this 80% Merino, 20% Cashmere blend feels better than most 100% Cashmere yarns (without the price tag, too!). Cashmere passion knits up at a light worsted gauge. The soft halo produced from the fabric yearns to be knit in a luxury accessory or classic knit. A truly cuddly yarn.

Cashmere: We have taken our Royal Cashmere to the next level. It is the same high quality Italian 100% cashmere in a new ball put-up. Best of all we have redefined the entire color palette. 10 colors ranging from classic to fun! Check it out. This is for that very special project-hopefully for yourself! 

Sophia Tweed: A multi colored binding thread twines around thick and thin Acrylic and Wool. Sophia Tweed is like a party in a ball. Stockinette and garter knits are soft and nearly weightless. We love this one for women’s garments and accessories in easy to knit patterns.

Spago: A light-as-a-feather novelty yarn with a bulky gauge. Spago self-stripes, and will knit well in simple stitches. Spago is ultra-textured and very fast to knit with.

Kid Gloss and Kid Gloss Hand Dyed:  We tested many Silk/Mohair blends to bring to you the finest of the lot. Kid Gloss is 72% Super Kid Mohair and 28% Mulberry Silk. Accept no substitutions! You need to knit this yarn to know it is the best! The color palette is very inspirational for mixing together yarns, for either double or single stranded projects.

Stella Jacq: We are so excited about this self-patterning worsted. If you are familiar with our Knitcol yarn, you will love its big sister, Stella Jacq. Jacq is taken from the word jacquard, which is a textile term for intricate patterning. 100% Machine washable wool. Exciting and stunning shades bring unexpected results. Suitable for babies, kids, and adventurous adults.

Baby Alpaca Cherish: 50% Acrylic and 50% Alpaca blended together to create the best of both worlds. A versatile DK weight, Baby Alpaca Cherish is a great yarn for the family. The alpaca lends its softness and drape, while the acrylic lends its wash-ability.  Stitch patterns and color-work alike work well with this new yarn.

Rekor Mini: This is a fun crafting packet of little balls of 10 yards each, in great color ranges. Bust out the imagination for these: duplicate stitch, granny-style square crochet, jewelry, etc.  Check out our free pattern booklets to get you started F557 and F558. 

Inspire and Impulse:  Stock up on these kits for holiday shoppers. 2 different yarns packaged with a pom-pom. And the ball band has the pattern inside for cute hats. 

Scozia: Brought to you from Adriafil, this tweed blend of wool, viscose and nylon has a great hand and a rustic outcome. Chunky for fast knitting, but a light weight finished garment.

Riflessi: Also from Adriafil, this 4 to the inch blend of wool, acrylic and nylon has a metallic thread braided into the chainette structure-subtle but very effective. 

 

Neon NOW!!!!!

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

From the Desk of Cia Abbott Bullemer

Spring is Springing!

And after our trip across the country to participate in the Spring Show of The National Needle Arts event, we here at Plymouth Yarn are PUMPED! We had a tremendous response for our neon colors in Encore Worsted and our new sock yarn called Neon Now!

After returning from Italy in July on a Yarn Sourcing trip, we witnessed the same about trends. Neon is still wildly out there!  It is hot, it is now, and it is available!

Here are a few examples of neon for color combos.  I love the one below with the black and grey-see how it makes the orange pop but yet not read completely neon? LOVE THAT!

And then putting orange and fuchsia together? Who’d have thought that worked. But it does! Tell us what you do with neon!

Neon Stripe      #fashion #styles

Neon on the runwayThis spring, is all about neon



Pitti Filati 2013 Fashion Trends

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

During the week of July 4th, Plymouth Yarn’s Marketing Manager, Christine and Design Director, Cia traveled to Florence, Italy for the Pitti Filati trade show. This event is “the main international event for the knitting yarn industry, a research lab and an observatory on global lifestyle trends.” They met with some of our current suppliers, visited some new ones and toured halls full of gorgeous designs.  Our team is working hard to bring these new products to yarn shop shelves in the upcoming seasons.

Bold colors were everywhere!

Bold colors were everywhere!

Creative color work

Creative colors and design work

Classic beauty and elegance

Classic beauty and elegance

Love the fur and fringe details!

Love the fur and fringe details!

Delicate sparkle and softness

Delicate sparkle and softness

Beautiful bows and braids!

Beautiful bows and braids!

Of course there are fun and funky looks too!

Of course there are fun and funky looks too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Booth With A View!

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Packing up and flying home is always the saddest part of leaving a TNNA trade show.  Plymouth Yarn staff and reps  love seeing all of their customers and showing the new and exciting things we have coming.  Our design team sent this video to me so I could see how gorgeous our booth is this year and I wanted to share it with you,  just in case you were like me….at home holding down the fort!

Encore Worsted Women’s Draped Cardigan

Monday, October 15th, 2012

One of my favorite things to do as a designer is to revamp Plymouth’s vast collection of classic yarns. Take Encore Worsted, for example. This yarn has been around since I was a little girl running around my mom’s yarn shop. Knitters were mostly picking out Encore for afghans, kids sweaters, and toys. Now, don’t get me wrong; Encore is terrific for all of these knits. But I think many people overlook this yarns vibrant colors (thanks acrylic!), it’s fluffy softness (thank you wool!), and durability.

Let me show you my newest creation using Encore Worsted. My draped cardigan is basically rectangle worked from side to side. The “afterthought” armhole stitches are picked up later and knit to an elbow length sleeve. Did anyone say layering?! The pattern stitch used along the hemline of the cardigan is an easy to memorize 6 row repeat.

I hope you all enjoy my cheerful design in a Plymouth classic. –Vanessa

 

Pattern F473

Encore Worsted Women’s Draped Cardigan

View as a pdf

To Fit Women’s Size: S, (M, L, XL, XXL)
Shoulder to Shoulder Measurement (across back): 12 ¼”, (12 ¾, 14, 14 ½, 15)
Length: 23”, (24 ¾, 26 ¾, 28 ¾, 31 ¼)
Sleeve Length: 14”

Materials:
Encore Worsted: 5, (5, 6, 6, 7)—100G balls, color 0473 Light Aqua
Gauge:  20 sts, 28 rows = 4” on size 7s over st st, 16 sts= 4” in 2×2 rib on size 7s (slightly stretched), 24 sts= 5” in pattern stitch on size 7s.
Needles:  Size US 7 long circular and double points, stitch markers, scrap yarn

Pattern Stitch (Multiple of 18 sts + 6)
Row 1 (RS): p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1, *k4, k2tog, yo, ssk, k4, p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1; rep from * across.
Row 2: k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1, *p3, p2togtbl, drop the yo of previous row, (yo)2x, p2tog, p3, k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * across.
Row 3: p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1, *k2, k2tog, drop the yo’s of the previous row, (yo)3x, ssk, k2, p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1; rep from * across.
Row 4: k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1, *p1, p2togtbl, drop the yo’s of the previous row, (yo)4x, p2tog, p1, k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * across.
Row 5: p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1, *k2tog, drop the yo’s of the previous row, cast on 4 sts onto right hand needle, k1 under the 4 loose strands of the dropped yo’s, yo, k1 under the 4 strands again, cast on 4 sts onto right hand needle, ssk, p1, k2, yo, ssk, p1; rep from * across.
Row 6: k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1, *p5, p2tog, p6, k1, p2, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * across.
Repeat these 6 rows for pattern.

Pattern is written for smallest size, with larger sizes in parenthesis. If only one number is given, it applies to all sizes.

Cardigan is made all in one piece, without seams. Afterthought armholes are set in place with scrap yarn, and picked up and knit in the round after the body of the cardigan is finished.

Body (starting with left front)
(sl the first stitch of every row)
With circular needle, Cast on 86, (90, 94, 98, 102) sts.
Row 1 (WS): p2, *k2, p2; rep from * across.
Row 2: k2, *p2, k2; rep from * across.
Repeat these 2 rows 3 times more. (8 rows total).
Increase Row (WS): (p2, k2)2x, p across to last 8 sts- increasing 18, (19, 20, 21, 22) sts evenly across to last 8 sts, (k2, p2)2x. 104, (109, 114, 119, 124) sts.
Pattern Setup Row (RS): (k2, p2)2x, pm, work row 1 of pattern stitch across 42 sts, pm, k to last 8 sts, (p2, k2)2x.
Next Row (WS): (p2, k2)2x, p to m, sl m, work next row of pattern stitch to m, sl m, (k2, p2)2x.
Next Row (RS): (k2, p2)2x, sl m, work next row of pattern stitch to m, sl m, k to last 8 sts, (p2, k2)2x.
Repeat the last 2 rows, progressing in the pattern stitch. When piece measures 11”, (11 ¾, 12 ¾, 13 ¾, 15 ¼), end having worked a WS Row.
Sleeve Row (RS): work in established pattern to second marker, sl m, (mark this area as the underarm), then with scrap yarn- k38, (40, 43, 45, 48) sts, cut scrap yarn (leaving a tail), place these 38, (40, 43, 45, 48) sts back onto the left hand needle and continue across row as established with main yarn.
Repeat sleeve row once more when piece measures 12 ¼”, (12 ¾, 14, 14 ½, 15) from previous sleeve row. Then, work even until piece measures 11”, (11¾, 12 ¾, 13 ¾, 15 ¼) from last sleeve row, end having worked a WS Row.
Decrease Row (RS): (remove markers as you get to them) (k2, p2)2x, k across to last 8 sts- decreasing so that there are 86, (90, 94, 98, 102) sts on the needles altogether, (k2, p2)2x.
Row 1 (WS): p2, *k2, p2; rep from * across.
Row 2: k2, *p2, k2; rep from * across.
Repeat these 2 rows 3 times more. (8 rows total). Bind off in rib on next row to match cast on rows tension.

Sleeves
Unpick the scrap yarn from one sleeve and divide the sts (from both the top and bottom) onto double points. 76, (80, 86, 90, 96) sts.
Join yarn at the underarm and pm.
Decrease 1 st before and after the underarm marker
every 5th, (4th, 4th, 3rd, 3rd) round 15, (17, 19, 21, 23)
times. 46, (46, 48, 48, 50) sts. Continue to work in st st until sleeve measures 12 ¾” from beginning of sleeve. Knit across next round, decreasing 10, (10, 8, 8, 10) sts evenly across. 36, (36, 40, 40, 40) sts.
Work in 2×2 ribbing for 9 rounds. Bind off all sts on next round. Repeat for the other sleeve.
Weave in all ends. Block lightly.

©2012 Plymouth Yarn Company. Designed by Vanessa Ewing. Modeled by Cia Abbott Bullemer. 092512vle

 

ABBREVIATIONS: dec = decrease, inc = increase, k = knit, pm= place marker, psso = pass slip stitch over,  p = purl, RS= right side, sl = slip,  SSK =  slip 1 st as if to knit, slip a second st as if to knit, knit them together through the back loop, st(s) = stitch(es), st st = stockinette st,  tbl = through back loop,  tog = together,  WS = Wrong Side, yo = yarn over, wyif = with yarn in front, wyib = with yarn in back

 

Fashion Show

Friday, November 18th, 2011

We were very happy to be part of the Vogue Knitting recent Vogue Knitting Live event.

Design!

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

It has now been several weeks since I started at Plymouth Yarn Company. I’ve been working closely with Creative Director JoAnne. Many of my patterns have been designed and made. It has been so thrilling to see the final product! The process to go from idea to finished pattern is definitely not short. I wanted to talk about the basics of how a pattern is made.
I usually get my ideas late at night, between half awake and almost in dream land. My sketch pad is right by my bed side just because of this! Usually my ideas come from what I observe in nature and from the past. I love mixing modern and new together to form a completely new and joyous knit; a hand knit that looks as much fun to make as it is to wear. I’ll sketch several versions of the knit I have in mind, tweaking each one… perhaps changing the trim width, making the collar larger or smaller, working on the stitch details. I’ll swatch the stitches I plan on using from my sketch with the yarn I have in mind. Sometimes, the swatch I make is perfect. However, sometimes it takes practice to perfect that one stitch. Like a fellow knit designer once said, “It takes many frogs to make the perfect prince.”
Once I have the perfect stitching and the best silhouette, I begin the process of technical design. This is where the mathematics become involved. Many options and questions need to be chosen and answered. Like, how fitted is this knit? What sizes are available? Is this tunic, standard, or cropped length? Once all of these questions are answered I can get down to the knitty gritty. I calculate the gauge and work it into the sizes and stitch pattern. Next, I tweak the pattern so that if selvedge stitches are needed, then they are added… or if a particular increase/decrease is not attractive with this garment, I will research a different or more attractive way to shape. If a pattern is really unusual, say a puffed sleeve with pleats, I usually will make the sleeve just to make sure the drape is enough and the pleats/shaping occurs precisely where I want it to.
Are you still with me? After all that is done, and the math is checked for accuracy, I pass the working pattern onto my trusty test knitters. They make the prototype garment and let me know of any changes that need to be made, or something that needs tweaking. At this point, I work very closely with the knitters and it is important that we understand what the finished product needs to be. This is so important, to help keep the integrity of the design as well as the future look of the finished knit. After the knit is finished, JoAnne and I schedule a photo shoot. Then the best pictures are chosen out of each set to ensure the best look for the knit as well best definition for stitch details. The pattern is ready, the picture is ready, and they are merged into a beautiful finished product.